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  #31  
Old 01-15-2009, 08:22 AM
Hagelrat
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Imzadi, good point, I always think of the books that got me into Sci fi and Fantasy but the films and shows I watched growing up (star Trek, The Dark Crystal, The Princess Bride) were hugely influential too. Especially in terms of Sci Fi, even now I watch more sci fi than I read, I read more horror and I consume fnatasy anyway I can get it.
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  #32  
Old 01-15-2009, 08:33 AM
Sakutian Sakutian is offline
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The Princess Bride movie probably had a hand in making me a little fantasy nut for the rest of my life. I loved that movie! What's reall ynice is that it holds up when you watch it years and years later too. My favorite character was always Inigo which isn't surprising for me. I read the book a few years ago just to see how close it was to the movie and I absolutely adored it, it's probably better than the movie which is really astounding considering how good they each are in their own right.

Apologies for the thread detour, I couldn't resist a chance to sing the praises of The Princess Bride.

Did anyone else read the Seventh Tower series by Garth Nix by any chance?
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Last edited by Sakutian; 01-15-2009 at 08:35 AM.
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  #33  
Old 01-15-2009, 02:21 PM
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I love Garth Nix but i've not read this, it was reviewed recently over on Pizza's book discussion.
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  #34  
Old 01-15-2009, 05:20 PM
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Well when I was a kid I read the typical fantasy stuff (The Hobbit, etc) and was a fan but around like 12 years old I started to totally reverse my thinking, wanted to read "real lit", etc. I was into mythology, still, though, but I considered fantasy to be nothing but derivative drivel.

But then I discovered Michael Moorcock, and I saw all the stuff brimming below the surface, and I realized that he was talking about real life as well, not just a made up kingdom. So I'd say that despite all the different authors I love, Michael Moorcock is the one who made me realize that sci-fi and fantasy are just as cromulent as anything else. Neil Gaiman did the same thing for me with comics, via the Sandman and the Books of Magic.

Oh, and I also used to watch Star Trek: TNG, Hercules and Xena with my Dad, then on my own. Those are some of my fondest memories, and if I could have any TV show back, it would be the last two.

BTW, isn't urban fantasy stuff like Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser? Greywalker and the Dresden Files, etc are modern fantasy, right? Sub-genre stuff is confusing.

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Originally Posted by Sakutian View Post
The Legend of Huma
Yeah, I'd say that the Legend of Huma and Kaz the Minotaur are the only two books worth reading in the whole DragonLance series. They're fun and not nauseatingly written. Some day I plan to compile a list of D&D books worth reading. It'll be short, and not have Drizzt on it ;-)
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  #35  
Old 01-15-2009, 05:41 PM
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Well... at the moment "Urban Fantasy" is a marketing term for "has cross genre appeal, dark fantasy elements, and a modern/contemporary setting". At least as far as I can tell. I'm not sure what they're doing with the old "Contemporary Fantasy" tag.

Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser I think of as traditional fantasy with a city setting--like Scott Lynch's books, they have all the standard traditional fantasy stuff going on and the setting doesn't really change the essential fantasy feel. Strictly My Opinion. (*YMMV)
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  #36  
Old 01-15-2009, 06:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eos View Post
Yeah, I'd say that the Legend of Huma and Kaz the Minotaur are the only two books worth reading in the whole DragonLance series. They're fun and not nauseatingly written. Some day I plan to compile a list of D&D books worth reading. It'll be short, and not have Drizzt on it ;-)
Personally I don't agree. Haven't read Kaz the minotaur (as far as I recall), But I do recall Huma being a bit boring. I think the first trilogy was the best.

There are some good D&D-books. Azure Bonds, Spellfire and the first books about Gord the Rogue are quite good as far as I recall.

/Magnus
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  #37  
Old 01-15-2009, 09:19 PM
Sakutian Sakutian is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eos View Post
Yeah, I'd say that the Legend of Huma and Kaz the Minotaur are the only two books worth reading in the whole DragonLance series. They're fun and not nauseatingly written. Some day I plan to compile a list of D&D books worth reading. It'll be short, and not have Drizzt on it ;-)

*Thumbs up*
I hope it will have The Middle of Nowhere, and The Sentinels of Magic too. Those were a few of my other favorties from teh Dragonlance stories. Amber and Ashes has been pretty good too but I haven't finished the last chapter yet so we'll see how that ends up.

I liked one of the Drizzt stories...Icewind Dale I think that was it. Although that's the only one I ever read all the way through other than that I'll pass on it.
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Last edited by Sakutian; 01-15-2009 at 10:16 PM.
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  #38  
Old 02-10-2009, 03:26 PM
Empress Che
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Jumping in...
Like a few of you...C.S. Lewis was my major push into the fantasy genre....much to my community's chagrin.
Fantasy/Sci-Fi are my favourites...though I latch onto mysteries when I come across one..
I stayed away from horror, though it seems that much paranormal is labelled as horror in some of the book stores I frequent...
Love Vampire novels (except Anne Rice), though the last couple of months it's been Werewolf novels. I'll segue into witch novels soon, if my Amazon list is any indication....
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  #39  
Old 08-03-2009, 02:21 PM
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Terry brooks made me the fantasy nut I am.
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